Holy Week & Easter

Move Button Move Button
Holy Week and Easter

Welcome!

We'd love to have you join us for our upcoming worship services! Journey with us through Holy Week, as we prepare our hearts for Easter! Join us in person, or tune in via our YouTube channel (links below).

---

Palm Sunday Worship

March 28 @ 8am & 10:30 am

(Rite of Confirmation during late service)

Click here for 8am live-stream

10:30am live-stream


Maundy Thursday Divine Service

April 1, 1:00 pm & 7:00 pm

7pm live-stream


Good Friday- April 2

Chief Service 3:00 pm

Tenebrae Service 7:00 pm

3pm live-stream

7pm live-stream


Holy Saturday Easter Vigil

April 3 @ 7:00 pm

7pm live-stream


Easter Sunrise Worship

April 4 @ 6:00 am


Easter Festival Worship

April 4 @ 8:00 & 10:30 am

8am live-stream


Move Button Move Button

EASTER EGG HUNT

Join us for the Egg Hunt on Saturday (March 27) at 10:30am. All ages welcome!


Sunshine: Gather outside by the playground and field.

Rain: Gather inside in the church sanctuary to learn which rooms the different age groups will be in.


Move Button Move Button

Lenten Devotions from Lutheran Hour Ministries

"Following the narrative of Mark’s Gospel, The Marks of Love explores the life and ministry of Jesus. The tragedy of Golgotha is met with the triumph of the resurrection on Easter morning. Along the way, we learn of Jesus’ deep compassion for those He loved and served, including those who put Him to death.

No story in human history is like the narrative of Jesus’ Passion. In it we see God in the flesh, coming to seek and to save the lost. In The Marks of Love, we meet a Savior who endured life’s hardships, suffered our pain, and bore the weight of our sins. Each left its mark on Him as He pressed on to the cross, giving His life for ours, appeasing God’s wrath against sin, and rising victorious over sin, death, and the devil."

-Lutheran Hour Ministries Website (https://www.lhm.org/lent/).


Hard Copy

Printed copies of "The Marks of Love" devotional booklet are available on the table in the church lobby.

Online

Click here to view the devotions online. There's also an option to listen to an audio recording on the daily devotion. Simply click the "Read Devotions" button. The audio option will be right next to today's date.


We pray that these devotions and selected scripture readings are a blessing to you!

Move Button Move Button

EASTER CROSS

What was a symbol of death has become a symbol of LIFE for us in the resurrection of Jesus Christ! +

Here at Heavenly Host we share the joy of Easter in a unique way! During the opening hymn, everyone is invited to add a flower to our Lenten Cross/Easter Cross. We invite you to bring a flower (any kind) to add to the cross on Easter morning. We will have extras, in case you forget and would like to put one on the cross.

We look forward to celebrating Easter with you!

"Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead." 

1 Peter 1:3

Move Button Move Button

Holy Week Services

Interested in learning about the upcoming services? See the descriptions below:


Maundy Thursday

    This service for Holy Thursday is the first service in the celebration of the holy three days of Christ’s Passover, commonly known as the Triduum, Latin for “the Three Days”. It completes the Lenten period of preparation for Christ’s Passion and Resurrection and leads into His sacrifice on our behalf. As such, the service, like that for Good Friday, exhibits a mood of restrained joy. It consists of four parts: the Service of Corporate Confession and Absolution, the Service of the Word, the Service of the Sacrament, and the Stripping of the Altar.

    The Service of Corporate Confession and Absolution signals the end of the Lenten preparations with the absolution and peace of Christ that stand at the center of the Three Days. The Service of the Word focuses upon Christ’s humble service demonstrated in His washing of His disciples’ feet, a servanthood enacted on the Cross and whose benefits are bestowed in the Lord’s Supper. The service culminates with the Lord’s ministry to His people through the Sacrament of the Altar.

    The depth of Christ’s servanthood is demonstrated as the altar is reverently stripped in preparation for the Church’s observance of Jesus’ death. In this service, the Church and her catechumens begin the journey through the three days of Christ’s Passover from death to life and from captivity to freedom. (adapted from LSB Altar Book)


Good Friday, Chief Service

Good Friday is part of the sacred Triduum (Latin for ‘three days’), the three-day observance of Christ’s Passover. The name may originally have been “God’s Friday,” but it is certainly also “good” because of the good gifts Christ won for us on this day. Good Friday is not observed as a funeral for Christ. It is a day of repentance over sin and restrained joy and praise for the redemption Christ accomplished for us on the cross.

The altar remains bare, having been stripped last night. Given the solemnity of the day, silence is observed at various times in order to reflect upon the Word of God. Because the service is part of the Triduum, it has neither entrance rite nor benediction. The concluding hymn ensures that the final note of the service is one of triumph, for God’s faithful know the end of the story.  

In earliest times, all the events of Christ’s passion, from the Last Supper to the resurrection were celebrated in one day and night’s continuous service called Pascha. The observance of the Triduum understands the services from the evening of Holy Thursday to Easter Sunday to form one, continuous liturgy. This is the Chief Service for Good Friday from Lutheran Service Book. It contains a number of ancient elements, particularly the reading of the St. John Passion, the Bidding Prayer, and the Reproaches.

There are differing opinions about whether it is appropriate to celebrate the Lord’s Supper on Good Friday. In the Early Church, the Lord’s Supper was celebrated on Good Friday in some places. In the Middle Ages the practice arose of distributing elements consecrated the previous day. The Lutheran Reformation considered this practice an abuse and discontinued it. This led some Lutheran church orders to omit the Sacrament entirely. Many other 16th-century Lutheran church orders included the celebration of the Lord’s Supper as part of the normal observance of Good Friday as a festival. If the day is observed in the spirit of restrained praise in thanks for the redemption Christ won on the cross, the distribution of the fruits of that death in the Sacrament of His true body and blood is a quite appropriate way to proclaim and remember Him. (LSB Altar Book).


Good Friday, Tenebrae Vespers

Good Friday is part of the sacred Triduum (Latin for ‘three days’), the three-day observance of Christ’s Passover. The name may originally have been “God’s Friday,” but it is certainly also “good” because of the good gifts Christ won for us on this day. Good Friday is not observed as a funeral for Christ. It is a day of repentance over sin and restrained joy and praise for the redemption Christ accomplished for us on the cross.

The service of Tenebrae (meaning “darkness”) consists of the extinguishing of the church lights. Historically, it occurred early in the morning at the Offices of Matins and Lauds on all three days of the Triduum. In recent times, the service has been observed only on the evening of Good Friday.

The altar remains bare, having been stripped last night. Given the solemnity of the day, silence is observed at various times in order to reflect upon the Word of God. Because the service is part of the Triduum, it has neither entrance rite nor benediction. The concluding hymn ensures that the final note of the service is one of triumph, for God’s faithful know the end of the story.  

In earliest times, all the events of Christ’s passion, from the Last Supper to the resurrection were celebrated in one day and night’s continuous service called Pascha. The observance of the Triduum understands the services from the evening of Holy Thursday to Easter Sunday to form one, continuous liturgy. This service is the Tenebrae Vespers for Good Friday from Lutheran Service Book. It contains a number of ancient elements, particularly the praying of the penitential psalms and the St. John Passion. Tenebrae concludes with the final collect. As with the other service for Holy Thursday, there is no benediction. The extended service of the Triduum will conclude with the Vigil of Easter. (LSB Altar Book). 


Easter Vigil (Saturday)

The Vigil of Easter, which is celebrated at the end of Holy Saturday as the conclusion to the sacred Triduum, is the first celebration of the Resurrection of our Lord. The Vigil of Easter connects the days of Holy Week, especially Holy Thursday and Good Friday, with the culminating celebration of the resurrection of Christ from the dead.  

In some places throughout the early centuries of the Church’s life, the people of God would hold vigil, which means “keep watch,” through the night in expectation of Christ’s return. A vigil in expectation of Christ’s return at Easter became a common feature of the celebration of His crucifixion and resurrection. The vigil consisted of prayer, psalms, hymns, and readings, especially from the Old Testament, culminating in the celebration of the resurrection at dawn with the Lord’s Supper. As the Church gathered in vigil, she waited in hopeful expectation for the appearance of the resurrected Christ in those most recently born in Him, the newly baptized. During the vigil, those who had prepared throughout Lent to be joined to Christ were baptized. At the dawn of the new day at Easter sunrise, the newly baptized, joined the entire Church in the chorus of alleluias at Christ’s resurrection from the dead.

While making a vigil through the night may not be common today, Christians nonetheless gather on Holy Saturday to wait in expectation for the news of Christ’s resurrection and for His second coming. As a service of watching that ushers in the resurrection, the Vigil of Easter is comprised of six parts: 1. the Service of Light, 2. the Service of Readings, 3. the Service of Holy Baptism, 4. the Service of Prayer, 5. the Service of the Word, 6. the Service of the Sacrament.

Because the Vigil of Easter marks the final day of the sacred Triduum, the service ends with the Benediction, which has not been heard since the beginning of the Triduum, and the Easter Acclamation: Christ is Risen! (LSB Altar Book)


Easter Sunrise


Easter Festival Worship